CLIP
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Immigration Matters

CLIP has an amazing collective of people who make up the CLIP Council, Immigrant Advisory Table and Working Groups, many of them were immigrants to Canada themselves. CLIP is a great example of newcomers engaging in the community. As we promote the #ImmigrationMatters campaign, we thought we’d share some of their stories and advice with you. In their own words, these are our newcomer stories!

#Immigration Matters: Facts & Figures

The Calgary Local Immigration Partnership (CLIP) is a multi-sector community partnership working to create welcoming communities for newcomers in Calgary. We believe in a city that celebrates diversity and promotes inclusive communities for all. When immigrants succeed, we all do well.

On Oct. 21, Canadians will decide on our next federal government. Immigration will be a topic of conversation between candidates and in discussions in workplaces, schools, and local communities.

CLIP is not endorsing any candidate or party and we welcome conversations on immigration. The following are provided as a ‘fact check’ for journalists and citizens alike. For more information about CLIP or any of the information cited below, please contact the CLIP Co-Chairs, Anila Lee Yuen (a.leeyuen@centrefornewcomers.ca) or Laureen McNeil (laureen.macneil@cmha.calgary.ab.ca).

CLIP has an amazing collective of people who make up the CLIP Council, Immigrant Advisory Table and Working Groups, many of them were immigrants to Canada themselves. CLIP is a great example of newcomers engaging in the community. As we promote the #ImmigrationMatters campaign, we thought we’d share some of their stories and advice with you. In their own words, these are our newcomer stories!


Global Calgarians[1]

  • 31% of the population of Calgary was born outside of Canada (383,065 people).

  • 92% of recent immigrants[2] to Calgary speak English or French.

  • 68% of recent immigrants to Calgary have completed post-secondary education.

  • 74% of Calgary’s recent immigrants are participating in the labour force (comparable to 73% of the general population).

Immigration continues to build the Calgary economy

Calgary Economic Development aims to make Calgary “the city of choice in Canada for the world’s best entrepreneurs”.[3] Immigrants contribute to the local and global economy through their experience and connections. This increases trade and expands cultural awareness and activities in the city.[4]

  • “There is no doubt the biggest opportunity involves the continued attraction of young people and families to Calgary, mostly from immigration. Since 2013, across Canada all net growth in the labour market has come from immigrants”.[5]

  • One third of Calgary’s workforce are immigrants, contributing in all sectors of the economy.[6]

  • 40% of workers in the manufacturing sector were not born in Canada.[7]

  • 33% of those working in professional, scientific and technical services were not born in Canada.[8]

  • 47% of engineers in Calgary are immigrants (Calgary has the largest share of engineers in its workforce of any urban centre in Canada).[9]

  • Immigrants represent 24% of the national workforce but account for 40% of computer programmers, 41% of engineers and more than 50% of all chemists.[10]

  • Immigrants make up 36% of all pharmacists and family physicians across Canada, as well as 39% of all dentists, 27% of all licensed practical nurses, and 35% of nurse aides and related occupations.[11]

  • In a recent Statistics Canada study, researchers found “… immigration led to the creation of a large number of new young firms. Through this process, immigrant-owned firms contributed disproportionately to net job creation over the period studied.[12]

  • Canada’s worker-to-retiree ratio is 4 to 1. By 2035, when 5 million Canadians are set to retire, the ratio will be down to 2 to 1, meaning there will be only two workers for every retiree.[13]

  • More than 80% of the immigrants admitted to Canada in recent years are under 45 years old, meaning they will have plenty of working years in Canada.[14]

  • 1,000 new families would generate over $20 million worth of taxes per year for local, provincial, and federal governments.[15]

Building diverse, inclusive communities

When immigrants settle well, they are more able to take part in the social, economic, cultural, and political life of the city.

  • 29% of independent artists, writers, and performers in Canada are immigrants.[16]

  • Immigrating to Canada is an adjustment at first but, with time, immigrant voting rates, sense of belonging, and earnings match those of Canadians.[17]

  • About 85% of newcomers become Canadian citizens.[18]

  • In 2016, one-third of immigrants volunteered and two-thirds were members of social organizations.[19]


[1] All data in this section is from Statistics Canada, 2016 Census of Population.

[2] Recent immigrants arrived in Canada in the five-year period between 2011 and 2016.

[3] www.calgaryeconomicdevelopment.com/assets/Calgary-in-the-New-Economy/Calgary-in-the-New-Economy-Final.pdf

[4] Economic Profile Series: Calgary, Alberta, Spring 2019. IRCC. Cat. No. Ci4-193/2-2019E-PDF ISBN 978-0-660-31085-5.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Immigration Matters website, https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/immigration-matters/track-record.html.

[11] Ibid.

[12] Statistics Canada: Immigrant Entrepreneurs as Job Creators: The Case of Canadian Private Incorporated Companies. https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11f0019m/11f0019m2019011-eng.htm

[13] Ibid.

[14] Ibid.

[15] Ibid.

[16] https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/immigration-matters/growing-canada-future.html.

[17] https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/immigration-matters/track-record.html

[18] Ibid.

[19] Ibid.